Anticorruption Bibliography–March 2019 Update

An updated version of my anticorruption bibliography is available from my faculty webpage. A direct link to the pdf of the full bibliography is here, and a list of the new sources added in this update is here. As always, I welcome suggestions for other sources that are not yet included, including any papers GAB readers have written.

KickBack: The Global Anticorruption Podcast

I’m pleased to announce the launch of KickBack: The Global Anticorruption Podcast, a joint enterprise between myself (on behalf of the GAB team), and the Interdisciplinary Corruption Research Network (ICRN), represented in this venture by Nils Kobis and Christopher Starke. Our plan for this podcast is to feature regular interviews with leading voices in the anticorruption field, from academia, politics, activism, journalism, and elsewhere. We hope that, like GAB, the podcast will help to enhance serious debate and discussion about important issues in the field from a variety of different perspectives.

For our first episode, we are delighted to feature an interview with Yale Professor Susan Rose-Ackerman. (What better way to launch our anticorruption podcast than with the person who helped launch the modern economic analysis of corruption?) You can find this episode, along with a separate segment in which Nils, Christopher, and I introduce the podcast (and ourselves), in the following locations:

We hope that the podcast will also be available soon on iTunes.

If you like it, please subscribe/follow, and tell all your friends! And if you have suggestions for voices you’d like to hear on the podcast, just send me a message and let me know.

Tracking Corruption and Conflicts of Interest in the Trump Administration–March 2019 Update

Since May 2017, GAB has been tracking credible allegations that President Trump, as well as his family members and close associates, are seeking to use the presidency to advance their personal financial interests, and providing monthly updates on media reports of such issues. The March 2019 update is now available here. A couple of the more notable new developments in this update:

  • A House of Representatives Oversight Committee released a report on a Trump Administration proposal to transfer nuclear technology to Saudi Arabia. President Trump’s son-in-law and senior advisor Jared Kushner was directly involved in discussions of this proposal. Brookfield Management, the asset management firm that effectively bailed out the Kushner family company by leasing the Kushner-owned property at 666 Fifth Avenue, also recently purchased a nuclear services company that would have directly benefited from the Saudi deal.
  • The General Services Administration (GSA) inspector general released a report questioning the GSA’s earlier decision that the Trump International Hotel’s lease on the D.C. Old Post Office was consistent with the terms of the lease; the IG stopped short of saying that the GSA’s determination was improper, but criticized the GSA lawyers for not addressing the constitutional issues implicated by this deal.

As always, we note that while we try to include only those allegations that appear credible, we acknowledge that many of the allegations that we discuss are speculative and/or contested. We also do not attempt a full analysis of the laws and regulations that may or may not have been broken if the allegations are true. For an overview of some of the relevant federal laws and regulations that might apply to some of the alleged problematic conduct, see here.

Video: Baker Center Conference on Controlling Corruption in Latin America

A few weeks back I was lucky enough to attend a mini-conference hosted by Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy entitled “A Worthy Mission: Controlling Corruption in Latin America.” The conference featured an opening keynote address by Yale Professor Susan Rose-Ackerman, with a brief response by BYU Professor Daniel Nielson, followed by two panels. The first of these panels (which I moderated) focused on anticorruption prosecutions in Latin America generally, and featured Thelma Aldana (who served as Attorney General of Guatemala from 2014-2018, and is rumored to be a likely presidential candidate), Paolo Roberto Galvao de Carvalho (a Brazilian Federal Prosecutor and member of the “Car Wash” anticorruption Task Force), and George Mason University Professor Louise Shelley. The second panel, moderated by Columbia Professor Paul Lagunes, focused more specifically on corruption control in Mexico, and featured Professor Jacqueline Peschard (former chair of Mexico’s National Anticorruption System), Claudio X. Gonzalez (the president of the civil society organization Mexicanos Contra la Corrupcion y la Impunidad (MCCI)), and Mariana Campos (the Program Director at another Mexican civil society organization, Mexico Evalua).

Video recordings of the conference are publicly available, so I’m going to follow my past practice of sharing the links, along with a very brief guide (with time stamps) in case anyone is particularly interested in one or more particular speakers or subjects but doesn’t have time to watch the whole thing. Here goes: Continue reading

Anticorruption Bibliography–February 2019 Update

An updated version of my anticorruption bibliography is available from my faculty webpage. A direct link to the pdf of the full bibliography is here, and a list of the new sources added in this update is here. As always, I welcome suggestions for other sources that are not yet included, including any papers GAB readers have written.

Tracking Corruption and Conflicts of Interest in the Trump Administration–February 2019 Update

Since May 2017, GAB has been tracking credible allegations that President Trump, as well as his family members and close associates, are seeking to use the presidency to advance their personal financial interests, and providing monthly updates on media reports of such issues. The February 2019 update is now available here

As always, we note that while we try to include only those allegations that appear credible, we acknowledge that many of the allegations that we discuss are speculative and/or contested. We also do not attempt a full analysis of the laws and regulations that may or may not have been broken if the allegations are true. For an overview of some of the relevant federal laws and regulations that might apply to some of the alleged problematic conduct, see here.

Anticorruption Bibliography–January 2019 Update

An updated version of my anticorruption bibliography is available from my faculty webpage. A direct link to the pdf of the full bibliography is here, and a list of the new sources added in this update is here. As always, I welcome suggestions for other sources that are not yet included, including any papers GAB readers have written.