ASIL/World Bank/OECD Symposium on Supranational Responses to Corruption–Call for Papers

The Anti-Corruption Law Interest Group of the American Society of International Law (ACLIG), the World Bank’s Office of Suspension and Debarment (OSD), and the OECD’s Anti-Corruption Division are organizing a symposium on “Supranational Responses to Corruption,” tentatively planned to be held in person in Vienna, Austria on November 18-19, 2021, with the possibility to participate remotely. The theme of the symposium–which is described in greater detail here–is “supranational responses to corruption.” In other words, the symposium will focus on current and prospective anticorruption efforts that transcend national boundaries or governments. Themes of this symposium may include, but are not limited to:

  • Efforts that can transcend national boundaries or governments structures when it comes to generating and operationalizing anticorruption policies and measures undertaken by intergovernmental organizations, regional organizations, institutional investors, donors, and private sector firms;
  • Efforts to establish regional/global investigative, prosecutorial, and adjudicatory anticorruption institutions;
  • Efforts to enhance coordination and collaboration among the actors undertaking anticorruption efforts at the international level.

The organizers are inviting proposals for both full papers (minimum 5,000 words) and short essays (minimum 2,500 words) from scholars, private sector professionals, international organizations professionals, policymakers, public officials, civil society organizations, and the broader international anti-corruption community. The deadline to submit a proposal is May 15, 2021 (a month from today). A proposal should be between 250 and 500 words, and should indicate how the proposed paper or essay relates to the themes of the symposium. To submit a proposal, you should send it (together with a brief biographical statement) to acsymposium2021@gmail.com. Successful applicants will be informed by June13, and the deadline for submitting the full paper or essay will be September 25, 2021.

This sounds like a great event on an important set of topics, so I hope that many of you will consider submitting proposals!

Announcement: ASIL Anti-Corruption Conference–Call for Papers

Jan Dunin-Wasowicz, Vice Chair of the Anti-Corruption Law Interest Group of the American Society of International Law (ASIL), contributes today’s post, which announces a conference that might interest GAB readers:

The ASIL Anti-Corruption Law Interest Group (ACLIG) has recently released a call for papers for its first works-in-progress conference. The conference is cosponsored with the Faculty of Law at Ono Academic College and is organized in close cooperation with the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). This conference presents an opportunity for critical evaluation of and feedback on new cutting-edge ideas and papers in the process of being created. The one-day event will take place in Kiryat Ono, Israel, on December 16 2019.

The organizers are soliciting presentation proposals from scholars, private sector professionals and practitioners, government officials, policy makers, civil society representatives and the broader international anti-corruption community on a wide range of topics relevant to the activities of the ACLIG and the anti-corruption work of the OECD. Themes of this first works-in-progress conference include, but are not limited to:

  • Cohesion and fragmentation in international anticorruption law
  • Multi-jurisdictional enforcement
  • Transnational compliance
  • Anticorruption and human rights
  • Anticorruption and climate change
  • Anticorruption and artificial intelligence
  • Anticorruption and rule of law
  • Anticorruption, privacy and data protection regulations
  • Evaluation of corruption control programs and policies
  • Ways and means to improve the measurement of corruption.

Presentation proposals are due by September 13, 2019.  Additional details on how to contribute to the conference are available here.

We hope many GAB contributors and readers will participate.

Guest Post: Paris Conference on the Transnationalization of Anticorruption Law–Call for Papers

Jan Dunin-Wasowicz, Vice Chair of the Anti-Corruption Law Interest Group of the American Society of International Law (ASIL), contributes today’s post, which announces a conference that might interest GAB readers:

The ASIL Anti-Corruption Law Interest Group, Sciences Po Law School, and the Zicklin Center for Business Ethics Research of the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania are organizing an international symposium on the “Transnationalization of Anti-Corruption Law.” The conference will take place at Sciences Po in Paris, France, on Thursday and Friday 6-7 December 2018. The organizers are accepting paper proposals until 23 July 2018.

The purpose of the conference will be to look back at the evolution of anticorruption law as it affects cross-border business, trade, and regulation, but without taking the standpoint of a particular jurisdiction. This retrospective review will seek to explore the mechanisms that have led to the development of modern “transnational” anticorruption law and standards. The conference will also discuss current challenges and possible ways forward. It will undertake to achieve these goals through an interdisciplinary approach considering public international law and private international law methods, as well as comparative law, among other fields, while looking at the role and influence of a variety of actors. The conference will also explore the contribution of other disciplines such as economics, political science, psychology, and anthropology to understand their impact on the development of anticorruption standards and their implementation in the transnational context.

With this in mind, the conference will consider whether and how anticorruption laws and standards should synergistically lean towards transnational harmonization, unification, or remain a multitude of overlapping and possibly at times conflicting regulatory and procedural regimes. Discussing possible adjustments in transnational anticorruption norms would imply looking at the following issues, among others:

  • What prompted the process of transnationalization in the area of anticorruption?
  • What does transnationalization mean in the anticorruption context?
  • Is there a normative hierarchy in anticorruption standards?
  • How are anticorruption law, concepts, and practices transplanted?
  • What is the role of international organizations, regulators, national courts, NGOs, civil society, private actors, and international tribunals in defining anticorruption norms and standards?
  • How should anticorruption regulators cooperate?
  • What is the effectiveness and legitimacy of transnational anticorruption law?
  • Can transnational anticorruption law find a coercive authority?
  • Should there be a world anticorruption court?
  • Has the transnationalization of anticorruption law gone too far?
  • What can be learnt from other disciplines when it comes to devising or implementing anticorruption laws and policies?

Additional details on how to contribute to the conference are available here. We hope many GAB contributors and readers will participate.

Announcement: ASIL Anti-Corruption Conference–Call for Papers

GAB friend and occasional contributor Professor Andrew Spalding contributes the following announcement:

The American Society of International Law (ASIL) has established an Anti-Corruption Interest Group (ACLIG)  designed to create a forum for mutual engagement among practitioners and scholars. The group will be holding its inaugural conference/workshop on October 2-3, 2015, at the University of Pennsylvania.

The ACLIG co-chairs (Professor Spalding and Professor Philip Nichols) are soliciting papers for this event, from both academics and practitioners. Those who are interested in giving a paper at the meeting should submit a one-page proposal to Ms. Lauretta Tomasco at tomascol@wharton.upenn.edu by August 7, 2015 (two weeks from today!). If accepted, a proposer must supply a paper of at least five pages by September 25, 2015. Copies of all papers will be distributed to all participants before the workshop, so that all workshop participants will be able to read the material in advance and come to the workshop prepared to thoroughly discuss the ideas contained in each paper. (The precise format of the conference/workshop will depend on the number of submissions received.)

Submissions on any topic related to corruption are welcome. Possible topics might include but are not limited to:

  • the nature, manifestations and forms of corruption
  • effects of corruption on business, economies, governments, or society
  • domestic control of corruption
  • comparative analysis of domestic corruption laws
  • corporate liability for corruption
  • codes of conduct to control corruption
  • contracting/controlling third party risk
  • corruption within nongovernmental organizations
  • collective anticorruption programs
  • anticorruption certification standards
  • control of transnational corruption
  • national and international anticorruption regimes
  • coordination of anticorruption regimes
  • soft law controls on corruption
  • legal recourse for victims of corruption
  • an anticorruption organization

Those who are interested but have further questions should please contact Professor Spalding at aspaldin@richmond.edu.