Guest Post: France Continues to Modernize its Procedures for Fighting Global Corruption—and Has Some Interesting New Ideas

Frederick Davis, a member of the New York and Paris Bars and a Lecturer in Law at Columbia Law School, contributes today’s guest post:

As recently as a few years ago, posts in this space by me and others bemoaned the striking inability of French authorities to prosecute French companies involved in global corruption. In the first fifteen years after France criminalized overseas bribery (thereby meeting its obligations under the OECD Convention on Combatting Bribery for Foreign Officials that France had signed in 1997), not a single French company had been convicted of this crime. This was attributed to the difficulty of pinning corporate criminal responsibility on corporations, as well as to limits in French criminal procedures that rendered its prosecutors unable to move as quickly, efficiently, and effectively as their U.S. counterparts. French deficiencies included the lack of both “sticks” (the credible threat of significant sanctions) and “carrots” (the ability to offer a deferred prosecution agreement (DPA) in exchange for self-disclosure and cooperation). The result: a number of iconic French companies reached negotiated outcomes with the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), and paid well over US$2 billion in fines and other payments to the U.S. government.

Resisting populist demands for retaliation, France instead changed its criminal procedures and enforcement institutions to address the challenge. The most notable changes include the creation of a National Financial Prosecutor’s Office with nationwide responsibility for many economic crimes, the creation of the French Anti-Corruption Agency to enforce compliance regimes, and the passage of the so-called Loi Sapin II, which increased penalties for financial crimes and introduced a French-style DPA called a Judicial Convention in the Public Interest. In addition to these reforms, France’s highest court has clarified the laws on corporate criminal responsibility, and in an unprecedented decision ruled that a parent or successor corporation remains criminally responsible for acts of an acquired entity even the acts took place prior to the acquisition.

The results of these reforms have been nothing short of remarkable: Continue reading