The Roles of Anticorruption Academics and Advocates: Insights from the NGO Side

One of the purposes of this blog (as noted in our mission statement) is to promote the interchange of ideas across disciplinary boundaries, including–indeed, especially–between researchers and practitioners. It turns out that despite our shared interests in understanding and fighting corruption, there’s often quite a gulf between the academic and advocacy communities. I’ve commented this difference in perspectives in the past (from the perspective of an Ivory Tower academic), both in general terms, and with respect to some particular topics, such as the optimal degree of simplification, the role of university education, and the use of eye-catching statistics. While I recognize that discussion of these issues may seem like navel-gazing, I actually think these conversations are quite important, given the complementary but distinct roles that academic research and advocacy work have in the overall anticorruption project.

I was therefore delighted to read a recent speech by Robert Barrington, the Executive Director of Transparency International UK, on precisely this topic. It’s one of the best discussions of this issue that I’ve come across. (And I’d say that even if he didn’t reference one of my posts on this blog!) Whereas I come at this issue from an academic perspective, Mr. Barrington is a leading voice in the advocacy community, and he has some good advice for all of us. The speech is very short, so instead of attempting to summarize it I’ll just encourage interested readers to click on the link above. But let me close here by quoting Mr. Barrington’s summation, with which I wholeheartedly concur:

We should be two communities that work closely together. There is little excuse not to. As an advocate, this is my message: our subject is too important for academics to be obscure or self-referential, or for NGOs to be ill-informed, misguided or unchallenged. Our choice is not whether to work hand-in-hand, but how we should do so.

One thought on “The Roles of Anticorruption Academics and Advocates: Insights from the NGO Side

  1. My own “two cents” on this topic having been very active in this space for over a decade, is that NGO’s and civil society are only interested in engaging with those who are “cheerleaders” for more enforcement (regardless of theories, regardless of resolution vehicles used, and indeed regardless of outcomes). While it is tempting to take the position that because bribery (however defined) is inherently bad, all attempts to enforce bribery laws must therefore be inherently good. However, as Congress recognized in passing the FCPA, the topics is not the “simple, safe issue it seemed at first blush.”

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